State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA)

National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity AgreementsThe State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA) is a national initiative to provide more access to online courses while maintaining compliance standards with state regulatory agencies. SARA allows institutions to provide online courses outside of their own state borders by seeking and maintaining state approvals via a streamlined process. To learn more about SARA, please visit: nc-sara.org.

On March 2, 2015, the Midwestern Higher Education Compact (MHEC) approved the State of Ohio to join SARA. On September 22, 2015, the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) approved institutional participation for The Ohio State University. The State of Ohio approved Ohio State University to participate in NC-SARA on September 11, 2015. NC-SARA is a voluntary, regional approach to state oversight of postsecondary distance education.

Current authorized SARA member states include: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and U.S. Virgin Islands.

NC-SARA Complaint Information can be found at: nc-sara.org/content/sara-and-students.

Professional Licensure

Important Note for Students: If you are considering an online academic program that leads to a professional license, it is highly recommended you contact the appropriate licensing agency where you plan to receive instruction before beginning your academic program. SARA does not provide reciprocity for state professional licensing requirements.  Academic programs and individual graduates must meet standards set by that state’s licensure requirements in order for a graduate to be eligible for a license.